Zero Waste Living! or How Trash Becomes a Rarity

Spring is accelerating, and every morning we wake up to see more and more greenery and blooming flowers. We are inevitably overwhelmed by the urge to go into nature and spend as much free time as possible breathing the fresh air. However, all the positive emotions are instantly evoked by the view that we also see in forests, parks, near lakes and rivers. That is the trash piling up and polluting our planet together with our bodies. Although the problem worries people worldwide, it is up to each of us to start tackling it. 

New Trend or Life-long Mission?

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure – this saying has been with us for what seems like forever, yet as we mentioned, one person is enough to make a change. Quite recently various social media platforms and people on them started to go crazy due to this relatively new trend – zero waste living. As some, of course, saw this just as another crazy trend to gain more attention, for thousands of people going zero waste is a conscious action they take to free the planet from waste. 

Even though the term ‘zero waste’ was first used only in the early 2000s, this environment-saving practice began way earlier in the 1980s. Back then, ‘zero waste’ was better known as ‘total recycling’ – Daniel Knapp and his wife tried to prove to everyone that all types of waste could be diverted from landfill and reused within the community. They then breathed in the life to the concept by opening a salvation market. A decade later, the same man set up a program to eliminate all waste in Australia by 2010. It formed a strong and successful concept with other initiatives, which now is known as Zero Waste Living. It is pretty amazing to see such an idea evolve and include more and more people each year united to save the planet from over polluting.

Basic Deeds Saves All

If we tried to explain the concept of zero waste living to our grandmothers, we should just say that we are aiming to send nothing to a landfill. The practice includes reducing what we need, reusing as much as we can once things cannot fulfil their original purpose, sending as little as possible to recycling centres, and composting. As all four components constitute the unified zero-waste system, they, of course, should be standard in every people’s lives. However, all should also be aware that recycling is the second to last option as growing consumerism goes hand in hand with mixed materials, which are almost impossible to recycle.

By committing to zero waste living, we generally redefine the system and move from a linear economy to a circular economy. It means quitting the practice of making new materials every time they are needed and then getting rid of them when they don’t. As we connect two ends of a line and make it into a circle, we stop creating materials from scratch because we have plenty of them that we can use repeatedly. For example, various countries have adopted the practice of a deposit-refund system, where people purchasing beverages pay an additional amount of money, usually ten or twenty cents, which they receive back after returning bottles to deposit stations. Even though it seems like a small step, this initiative has already helped free nature from millions of plastic and glass bottles as well as metal cans. Therefore, a cleaner planet and healthier human lives all start with taking small yet incredibly responsible steps.

Same Vision – Different Devotion

We can all leave a positive footprint on earth if we put in the effort and turn all our thoughts in that direction. Yet as expected, people take different paths towards an outcome of clean and unpolluted nature. One of them is more like going backwards than moving forward. Many people would instead continue accumulating vast amounts of trash every day rather than rethinking their practices and making some changes; we can call such people ‘those who do not care.’ Another group of people may genuinely want to reduce the amount of plastic packaging they use but are forced against such a decision. Switching to more ecological, natural and recycled ideas is a more considerable burden for one’s bank account than buying factory-produced cheaper but often disposable items. Indeed, zero waste products are usually sold in small local shops and made from sustainable yet more expensive material alternatives – wood, bamboo, metal, glass, etc. So to say, people who decided to switch to this nature-friendly movement should have bigger expenses in mind.

Even though zero waste living now seems like a well-known practice with a clear goal in the minds of those who are determined to live more responsibly, there are at least two different levels of this sustainable devotion. Moving from a comfortable life using plastic goods to far more responsible consumption may be too much of an extreme change. Therefore, people start with the low-impact lifestyle, which focuses on holistically reducing one’s environmental impact – together with second-hand shopping, plant-based diet and similar practices, people are getting closer to their intention. Zero waste life includes all of the mentioned actions, but it focuses more on eliminating waste, as said. Many are hesitant to devote their life to zero waste as social media is filled with videos and stories of people fitting all of their trash accumulated within a year into a small glass jar. However, only the most extreme cases of a zero-waste lifestyle can be fit into a jar as it is quite a struggle to find all necessary goods unpacked or packed in recyclable materials. Despite differences, all situations are commendable as they add to a safer environment and brighter future of billions.

First Steps are the Hardest 

We all know how much courage it takes to turn your life upside down. Therefore, we encourage to begin with small steps and gradually include more and more zero waste lifestyle practices into everyday life. For this very reason, we decided to help you by giving some tips our teammates swear by switching from unrecyclable plastics to one tiny glass jar containing all of your trash and other natural resources-preserving practices. Let’s begin!

Hobbies. We all can agree on how excellent new books smell: the smell of comfort on the rainiest autumn day. No matter how therapeutic paper books can be, this habit hurts the earth’s lungs – many trees are cut to produce one book, which most people will read only once after buying it. Solving this problem and becoming a zero-waster could be done two ways. One requires you to visit used book shops, search for people willing to exchange books or register for local library membership. All these ideas still give you the experience of holding an actual book in your hands; however, the following tips are more technological. Trees are saved by listening to audiobooks or reading electronic versions on a tablet. 

Beauty. Most of the women wash their hair once every two days or even every day. Despite global quarantine and pandemic shifted their usual hair washing schedule, we can guarantee most of them using shampoos, conditioners and rejuvenating hair masks from plastic bottles. When they are empty, they are tossed straight to the bin and later end up in landfills worldwide. Solid shampoo bars have been available for quite some time, yet they are not that popular as shampoo bottles just for their packaging. Soon we will offer a fantastic solid shampoo with all the best hemp qualities – be patient!

Food. Oh, how sweet it is sometimes to take a day off from cooking and how convenient it is to have delicious food delivered right to your doorstep! Food delivery is a relatively new concept, yet it produces very much plastic packaging, which cannot be recycled and takes hundreds of years to decompose. Again, we can tackle this problem from two perspectives – restaurant and cafes should switch to recycled cardboard packaging and cutlery. As people mostly order food due to craving and impulses, one should be prepared for such situations in advance by filling their freezers with quick-to-made healthy food. Besides, we highly encourage you to buy all of the food in farmers markets – it is both more ecological and cheaper!

Many companies and brands are now changing their strategies to be as sustainable as possible. Biomedicanna is no exception in encouraging our customers to take care of nature; we at the same time are taking care of ourselves – our bodies, skin, mind, and well-being. We are advocating the reuse of items, thus preventing them from entering the landfill, so all of our cosmetic containers are perfect for a second life in your home – pour a bath salt, light a candle or put the jewellery. Remember, love for ourselves starts from loving our surroundings.

Newest Trend – Sustainable Fashion!


After a challenging summer, real fashion icons have returned to the cities to conquer its streets and hearts of passers-by: they wear eye-catching accessories and never miss the latest fashion trends. They not afraid to visit second-hand clothing shops and to wide open the closets of mothers and grandmas. The secret of their success and wonderful appearance does not depend on the widest smiles or salon-like hair: their real talent is a sense of style and ability to match unmatchable clothing items together. Modern fashion icons care not only about the breathtaking image but also about the environment: as 13 million tons of textile waste is dumped in landfills every year, sustainable fashion is becoming the major highlight of any clothing combination.

What’s wrong with fast fashion?

Fast fashion is a term used to describe fashion retailers capturing current fashion trends and filling clothing stores with fashionable items similar to the ones seen at Fashion Week. Even if it allows people from all around the world to quickly adopt their wardrobes to fit ongoing trends, fast fashion has more cons rather than pros.

The current fashion industry is built on several different collections presented throughout the year, and millions of people buying at least one new item every season. The sales increase several times a year when prices are chopped massively to empty shopping racks for new items. As low prices lure customers, they are also forced to come back to the same clothing shopping centres over and over again due to fast fashion items also being fast to wear out and rip apart.

For this, you may say thank you to fashion retailers who only care about lowering the manufacturing cost and increasing revenue. This goal is achieved in several ways: firstly, fashion companies use cheaper textiles and sewing materials; secondly, they pay suppliers very small amounts of money for the materials received. Here fast fashion’s problems do not end: the majority of retailers sew their clothes in Asian countries – in factories where children work long hours and get only pennies.

Fast fashion is dependent on acquiring materials as cheaply as possible. As it can take as much as 2 700 litres of water to produce enough cotton material to make a single t-shirt, retailers often choose fake versions of expensive textiles and suppliers, which are known for using harmful chemicals. Of course, some well-known high street fashion shops offer their customers items made from eco-friendly materials and manufactured responsibly. However, these kinds of items are more expensive, from special collections only, and they make up only a small part of all clothes.

Fashion sustainability and us

Sustainable fashion is a social movement encouraging both customers and retailers to transform their habits and businesses towards a greater goal – ecological integrity and environmental awareness. Even though the term sustainable fashion itself concerns clothing as such, it actually has two meanings, including responsible use of already existing clothing items to prevent them from being dumped in landfills and sustainable production of new things to conserve nature and natural resources.

Responsible wearing does not mean being extremely careful not to ruin your clothes with dirt. It stands for choosing second-handed items rather than buying new ones and giving up beloved but not fitting or boring things by handing them over to new people rather than dumping them. Considering the fact that fashion trends come around once every few decades, second-hand clothing shops are a real gold mine, where vigilant buyers may find a designer or never worn items for extremely low prices. There are a few innovative ways allowing customers easier to transfer, donate, or sell their clothing items, which are still in a good shape. Responsible fashion not only saves money but also reduces one’s carbon footprint.

When old clothing items are too worn out and no longer suitable for wearing, some types of materials can be recycled back into clothing fibres, thus, being returned back into stores as new clothing items. As it saves resources, there are plenty of ways and materials, which can be used to produce more sustainable, society, and nature-friendly clothes.

 Hemp clothing is conquering the industry of sustainable fashion as it requires little water to grow and is resistant to most pests and diseases. Hemp’s advantages do not end here as other parts of the hemp plant also have a use; for example, seeds are often processed into oil and praised for its health increasing abilities. Hemp material itself is not only sustainable and versatile but durable and long-lasting; clothes are comfortable to wear, do not cause allergic reactions to the touching skin, and are easily washable.

Why being sustainable is the new black?

With each year, the number of sustainable clothes in stores increases prompting the growing demand: knowing that high fashion houses are fashion trendsetters, they welcome and adapt the sustainability approach influencing high street retailers and people to do the same.

Most popular brands advocate not only for inclusivity and ethnic diversity but also for high fashion sustainability as Paris, Milan, and New York fashion weeks’ catwalks are driven by themes of consumerism, ecology, and global warming. For example, one American fashion designer ensures the sustainability of her clothes by keeper her production small – the physical journey from sketch to garment does not exceed 20 kilometres radius. Other designers ensure they use responsibly sourced and recycled materials, create small runs of each collection to fight against fast fashion, or hires locals to help with the manufacturing process and reduces unemployment. Soon from catwalks, sustainable fashion ideas reach our homes and wardrobes: we gladly buy items that do not harm our planet and contribute to nature’s preservation. Of course, selling such clothes adds up to the brand’s reliability and popularity - as every little help matters, sustainability becomes more and more fashionable.

As a sustainable approach encourages consumers to say that ‘less is more’, capsule wardrobes are the number one thing any person should be doing to actually live by those words; this method allows people to wear different styles by combining basic clothing items. Such an approach should not mean wearing only boring and earthy-colours as sustainable fashion includes using natural dyes and improving the overall look by putting on long-lasting accessories. Also, responsible clothing does not mean wearing thin fabrics processed as little as possible - technologies let manufacturers create thicker fabrics suitable for colder climates, hemp material being one of them.

Sustainable thinking takes over our thoughts and lives – as it saves the planet, it also saves us. We must reduce the amount of textile being dumped, reuse still wearable items, and recycle one’s that are not suitable for wearing. As the popularity of hemp clothing is only growing, it is nice to be your own trendsetter and choose responsibly – we will soon offer quality hemp clothing to suit your body and your needs, so be patient and friendly to nature!

If You have any question, contact us!