Train your brain to sleep better

Sleep is essential for good mental health, although not everyone is able to fall asleep or stay asleep. In this blog we’ll explore the reasons behind sleeplessness, how quality sleep brings quality of life and tips on dealing with insomnia. 

What causes sleeplessness?

Stress is a leading cause of abnormal sleep patterns. Research shows it is a common trigger for both short-term and chronic insomnia. Stress can result from concerns about work, school, health, finances, anxiety and depression among other things, but perhaps the most deceptive cause is the fast-paced media packed world in which we live. Technology, world events and our ever-increasing knowledge about our world and the universe seem to have put time on a relentless treadmill and keeping up can wear out even the most determined among us. According to scientific research, stress creates incoherence in our heart rhythms, and when the heart is out of sync normal sleep patterns can be interrupted. 

Poor sleep habits can cause difficulties sleeping, this includes going to sleep at irregular times, taking naps during the day, having stimulating activities before bed such as exercise, having an uncomfortable sleep environment, and using your bed for work, eating or watching TV.  The use of your smartphone, computer or other screens just before bed can interfere with your sleep cycle as the usual blue light stimulates your brain to be awake.

Eating late in the evening can too be a factor in sleeplessness, especially food that is high in carbohydrates and sugar. This may cause you to feel physically uncomfortable while lying down. Many people also experience heartburn, a backflow of acid and food from the stomach into the oesophagus after eating, which may keep you awake.

Traveling or a late work schedule is also a culprit. Your circadian rhythm acts as an internal clock, guiding such things as your sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and body temperature. Disrupting your body's circadian rhythms can lead to insomnia. Causes include jet lag from traveling across multiple time zones, working a late or early shift, or frequently changing shifts.

Why quality sleep is vital for your body?

When you sleep your brain works hard releasing hormones and processing information from your day. This is important for creating long term memories, as your brain combines all the information it has picked up during the day and files it away for later use. While you’re sleeping, your pituitary gland releases human growth hormone (HGH), which helps the body to grow and repair itself.

The body’s immune system releases small proteins called cytokines while sleeping. These cytokines help the body fight inflammation, infection and trauma. Without enough sleep, your immune system might not be able to function at its best.

Sleep allows your sympathetic nervous system, which controls your fight or flight response, to take a much needed break. Studies have shown that when we’re deprived of sleep, sympathetic nervous system activity increases, which is also mirrored by an increase in blood pressure. Levels of cortisol, often called the stress hormone, decreases during the first few hours of sleep before rising to peak soon after you wake up. 

train your brain to sleep better

Tips on bettering your sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep is important in maintaining quality physical and mental health. There are several things that you can do to promote good sleep and ultimately get a better rest.

First things first it’s important to maintain a regular sleep routine. Do this by going to bed and waking up at a regular schedule. Ideally, aim to not stray from your sleep routine by more than 20 minutes every night of the week.

Avoid napping during the day. Instead, perhaps pop your earphones in and listen to some guided meditation. There are many different types of meditation, but they all come down to one basic tenet – relaxing the mind and trying to focus on the breath. Meditation is a way to exercise the unconscious mind, practice mindfulness and lessen anxieties. Although it’s not as traditionally restful as a nap, a session of meditation is another valid way to refresh and revive – and a meditation habit has multiple benefits to both mood and productivity. 

When we take naps, it decreases the amount of sleep that we need the next night – which may cause sleep fragmentation and difficulty initiating sleep, and may lead to insomnia and sleep deprivation.

If you find your mind racing, or worrying about not being able to sleep during the middle of the night, don’t stay in bed tossing and turning. Instead, get out of bed and sit somewhere in the dark. Do your mind racing in the chair until you are sleepy, and then return to bed. Avoid looking at your phone or turning on the TV during this period as it will just stimulate you more than desired.

Try to read, watch TV or surf the internet outside of your comfy bed. This is because your brain might associate the bed with wakefulness. It’s best to reserve the bed for sleep only.

Avoid drinking caffeinated drinks such as coffee, black and green tea, energy drinks and cola. The effects of caffeine may last for several hours after ingestion. Caffeine can fragment sleep, and cause difficulty initiating sleep. If you drink caffeine, use it only during the first part of the day, however it would be better to look into alternatives such as chicory root ‘coffee’, carob and ginseng.

Get your body moving! Exercise before 2 pm every day. Even stretches or a walk is great for your body’s overall health and can promote continuous sleep. Avoid rigorous exercise before bedtime. Rigorous exercise circulates endorphins into the body which may cause difficulty initiating sleep.

It’s great if you prepare your bedroom for sleeping. A lower temperature can promote better sleep. So open a window or lower the thermostat some time before going to sleep. Having blinds to keep any light out is also great in activating our natural sleep cycle.

train your brain to sleep better

For some, the use of CBD oil has shown to be very beneficial. Recent research published in 2019 looked at whether CBD could improve sleep and/or reduce anxiety. The study involved 72 subjects, with 47 experiencing anxiety and 25 experiencing poor sleep. The subjects were each given 25 mg of CBD in capsule form each day. In the first month, 79.2 % of the patients reported lower anxiety levels and 66.7 % reported better sleep. 

Sleep is important and you know that too well. Help yourself by trying out as many of these suggestions as you can and implementing them into your routine. It will better your sleep, overall health and well-being.

OMG…! Is that CBG??!

CBG. After hearing or seeing these three letters for the first time, one could most probably imagine anything… It can sound as a shortened saying of a city in USA, a comics character (probably the evil one), or a name of a music band. For some, it could even sound as a condition of a serious illness. Imagine someone saying – ‘Today I had an appointment with my GP and got to know that I have too much CBG in my blood!’ Or else, the expression itself even sounds like ‘OMG’. But really, what does this all stand for? If you turn on a Google search engine on your computer and fill this in, it leads to several different acronyms, that are too interesting not to share. For your entertainment, there are the funniest ones:

CBG Corticosteroid Binding Globulin

CBG Chicago Botanic Garden

CBG Comic Book Guy (The Simpsons)

CBG Compagnie des Bauxites de Guinée (French: Bauxite Company of Guinea; Guinea)

CBG Crazy Boys Generation (band)

And many more… Among around a hundred of acronyms, the one on the 12th place of the list we get is ‘Cannabigerol’.

What is this? And why could this be important? 

Our topic will be focused on this (curiously sounding) term, which exclusively covers the whole article. First of, Cannabigerol is a substance that comes from a Cannabis plant. By now, most people familiar with cannabis have heard of such terms as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol), and, of course, most people know their effects. But there are many, many more compounds in this. One of a lesser - known cannabinoids is called cannabigerol (CBG), and while (in most occasions) not present in large quantities, it is, nonetheless, worth learning about this one, - for number of reasons.

So, how is CBG made?

Because it is present in low levels (usually less than 1%) in most cannabis strains, just because of the quantity, CBG is considered one of a ‘minor’ cannabinoids. Cannabis plants naturally produce cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), the precursor to the three main cannabinoid lines: tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA).

If you’d be wondering how the CBG looks like (or how beautiful it is), here is an example:                                                                 

This picture resembles the molecule of CBG,- such an important substance, that has been found to act as a matter having a really high affinity,- Cannabigerol has been shown to relieve intraocular pressure, which may be of benefit in the treatment of glaucoma. It has been shown to improve a model of inflammatory bowel disease induced experimentally in mice. CBG can also affect positively the reactions in the brain, therefore can decrease anxiety and muscle tension.

CBG’s potential and medical benefits

CBG is not as much of a known substance, although lab-testing and research is being done on considering a possible high, very positive benefits for a human-kind today and in the future. This might be of a matter that we won’t imagine our lives without it soon, and I mean very soon: 

The human body’s built-in endocannabinoid system (ECS) works to keep the body in its balanced state. While there are specific details about how cannabinoids work, in general the endocannabinoid system performs different functions specific to each area of the body. The ECS is largely comprised of endocannabinoids, receptors, and enzymes that are believed to help regulate a variety of functions in humans including sleep, mood, memory, appetite, reproduction, and pain sensation. For example, at an injury site, the ECS can help regulate immune cells to limit inflammation. This means, that it serves a vital purpose for our health and well-being because it regulates key aspects of our biology.

Researches have been done

There are done some specific researches, and results for medicinal use are very promising:

Endocannabinoid receptors are prevalent in eye structures, and interestingly, CBG is thought to be particularly effective in treating glaucoma because it reduces intraocular pressure. It is a powerful vasodilator and has neuroprotective effects to boot.

In a recent 2015 study, CBG was shown to protect neurons in mice with Huntington’s disease, which is characterized by nerve cell degeneration in the brain.

CBG is showing great promise as a cancer fighter. Specifically, CBG was shown to block receptors that cause cancer cell growth. In one such study, it was shown to inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells in mice, thereby slowing colon cancer growth.

European research shows evidence that CBG is an effective antibacterial agent, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) microbial strains resistant to several classes of drugs. Since the 1950s, topical formulations of cannabis have been effective in skin infections, but researchers at the time were unaware of the plant’s chemical composition.

In a very recent 2017 study, researchers showed that a form of CBG was a very effective appetite stimulant in rats. This may lead to a novel non-psychotropic therapeutic option for cachexia, the muscle wasting and severe weight loss seen in late stage cancer and other diseases.

In a study that looked at the effects of five different cannabinoids on bladder contractions, CBG tested best at inhibiting muscle contractions, so it may be a future tool in preventing bladder dysfunction disorders.

Scientists are excited, so should we!  These initial CBG results are a path for the bright future. Scientists are promoting further research with CBG alone or in combination with other cannabinoids and use it in therapies for the treatment of multiple maladies. Because it is non-psychotropic, CBG has a promising wide range of potential applications not only for the problems mentioned above, but also as an analgesic, therapy for psoriasis, and effective antidepressant.

https://biomedicanna.com/product/cbg-paste/

What is CBD?

‘CBD – to understand immediately’

CBD or Cannabidiol is actually one of the many wonderful cannabinoids that are found in the hemp plant. CBD oil is derived from the hemp plants flowers and not the seeds making the extraction process a true form of scientific art. 

CBD is a completely natural substance, which has been seen to have many uses and benefits for the human body. Another wonderful fact about CBD is that it has no psychoactive effects, allowing people to use it, have great effects without the fear of getting ‘high’. 

How does CBD work?

CBD just like other cannabinoids work by interacting with the receptors found throughout the human body - in our organs, connective tissues, glands, immune cells, and brain. It is able to do this because CBD closely resembles chemicals that the body creates naturally. This system of chemicals and receptors is called the endocannabinoid system.

In this system there are two types of cannabinoid receptors – CB1 and CB2. CB1 is mainly found in nerve cells, brain and spinal cord. CB1 present in the hypothalamus affecting appetite and CB1 in hippocampus influence memory processing in the brain.CB2 is located in the peripheral nervous system. One of the main functions of this receptor is to keep the body’s immune system healthy by regulating the release of cell signalling molecules. This regulation boosts cell to cell communication and accelerates the movement of cells towards the area of inflammation. 

By stimulating cannabinoid receptors many cannabinoids including CBD are capable of reducing pain and inflammation along with stimulating appetite, boosting rest and promoting sleep.

What are the benefits of CBD?

CBD is being used for many medical disorders such as pain management such as arthritis and multiple sclerosis, depression and anxiety, sleeping disorders, even seizures such as epilepsy and easing cancer treatment symptoms. It is also a great immunity booster with anti-inflammatory properties. 

Lastly, researchers say that cannabis is one of the oldest domestic plants which are used by the human race for at least 10,000 years. Since our bodies have receptors, cannabis experts say consuming cannabis is a natural way of life.

If You have any question, contact us!