The ‘Magic’ of CBD

Throughout all kinds of centuries people believed in magic and knew that it was used both with good and bad intentions, to get different results, respectively. Just as the word magic itself being so broad, abstract and mysterious can really have multiple meanings, so the things that embody it can have the full variety of qualities: both beneficial and harmful, if used improperly. 

A very long time ago, there was someone who found a weird looking plant, and decided to ‘’give it a go’’. It is not clear how long it took for homo sapiens to realise the benefits of the plant and how to use it wisely (knowing that this has been researched up until now, with exciting observations being found each day), although one thing should have been strikingly obvious since the very beginning, -  there is something magical about this plant! The plant we now call Cannabis. 

,,- So where is the magic then?’’ you might ask. 

Let us tell you a story…

…Since Ancient times many cultures used cannabis to treat plenty of illnesses: 

Practitioners in China treated malaria, gout and menstrual symptoms, while in Medieval Ages cannabis was used particularly for pain, epilepsy, nausea and vomiting. In US it was prescribed for multitude of reasons for long time up until the 1970 when it was claimed illegal. 

That’s when apparently things went forward in terms of research, - people started to look for something more concrete, logical and trustful. Maybe for a bit safer word than magic…

The plant qualities have been researched for long time so now we have a clear idea of the various effects of it. 

Tests are being made, studies are done, scientific terms are given, so we feel informed, secure and have a full access to the knowledge that was being built up for such long time. 

What is the best about it?

What we know now is that cannabis plant contains more than 80 various chemicals called cannabinoids, from which the most important are two. As the mother nature likes dualities (good and bad, male and female, yin and yang), therefore in this case we’ll discuss two interesting elements as well, both being similar and very different from each other: THC and CBD. 

Both being magical in their own way, they trigger the central nervous system. But you have heard of THC already, most probably… While THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) is the ‘cheeky’ one which triggers the psychic (therefore is called psychoactive) and can get us ‘high’ by making our head spin, there is another element, CBD, or in other word, Cannabidiol. This is the ’good guy’ and our future’s saviour, wiser people might say!

How does the CBD work? 

The extract works with the specific body’s so - called endocannabinoid system, which regulates our most important processes of daily life: pain, mood, appetite, and memory. It works with the body’s natural system rather than being an unnatural or chemical substance, therefore there is no chance that body could reject it.

What about the benefits? 

CBD approaches a human nervous central system providing with an explicit goodness. It has a multiple, extraordinary beneficial qualities. CBD has been studied for its role in treating number of health issues:

Recent research has linked CBD with several benefits for the heart and circulatory system, including the ability to lower high blood pressure.

Studies suggest that CBD may help people with schizophrenia and other mental disorders by reducing psychotic symptoms (36Trusted Source).

CBD has been shown to modify circuits in the brain related to drug addiction. In rats, CBD has been shown to reduce morphine dependence and heroin-seeking behavior (37Trusted Source).

In test-tube and animal studies, CBD has demonstrated anti-tumor effects. In animals, it has been shown to prevent the spread of breast, prostate, brain, colon and lung cancer

In diabetic mice, treatment with CBD reduced the incidence of diabetes by 56% and significantly reduced inflammation

Where does the magic comes from? 

The extract is sourced usually from hemp, which is naturally high in CBD, and fortunate for us, - we have various of ways to extract the oil by leaving it pure with all its benefits and ‘’goodies’’. The most important part of it is that CBD oil doesn’t have THC, or any sign of it, so it is perfectly suitable for people of any age, including children.

That’s the part or this beautiful plant that can be indeed called magical

Let’s make one thing clear straight away: the components that are in CBD oil won’t make you feel like you’re an Alice in the Wonderland,- the furniture around won’t be getting bigger and there won’t be any rabbit with a clock-watch jumping around you, hurrying you to meet a blue caterpillar. Most importantly, it will rather help you find that deserved wonderland in your very own body and mind.

OMG…! Is that CBG??!

CBG. After hearing or seeing these three letters for the first time, one could most probably imagine anything… It can sound as a shortened saying of a city in USA, a comics character (probably the evil one), or a name of a music band. For some, it could even sound as a condition of a serious illness. Imagine someone saying – ‘Today I had an appointment with my GP and got to know that I have too much CBG in my blood!’ Or else, the expression itself even sounds like ‘OMG’. But really, what does this all stand for? If you turn on a Google search engine on your computer and fill this in, it leads to several different acronyms, that are too interesting not to share. For your entertainment, there are the funniest ones:

CBG Corticosteroid Binding Globulin

CBG Chicago Botanic Garden

CBG Comic Book Guy (The Simpsons)

CBG Compagnie des Bauxites de Guinée (French: Bauxite Company of Guinea; Guinea)

CBG Crazy Boys Generation (band)

And many more… Among around a hundred of acronyms, the one on the 12th place of the list we get is ‘Cannabigerol’.

What is this? And why could this be important? 

Our topic will be focused on this (curiously sounding) term, which exclusively covers the whole article. First of, Cannabigerol is a substance that comes from a Cannabis plant. By now, most people familiar with cannabis have heard of such terms as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol), and, of course, most people know their effects. But there are many, many more compounds in this. One of a lesser - known cannabinoids is called cannabigerol (CBG), and while (in most occasions) not present in large quantities, it is, nonetheless, worth learning about this one, - for number of reasons.

So, how is CBG made?

Because it is present in low levels (usually less than 1%) in most cannabis strains, just because of the quantity, CBG is considered one of a ‘minor’ cannabinoids. Cannabis plants naturally produce cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), the precursor to the three main cannabinoid lines: tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA).

If you’d be wondering how the CBG looks like (or how beautiful it is), here is an example:                                                                 

This picture resembles the molecule of CBG,- such an important substance, that has been found to act as a matter having a really high affinity,- Cannabigerol has been shown to relieve intraocular pressure, which may be of benefit in the treatment of glaucoma. It has been shown to improve a model of inflammatory bowel disease induced experimentally in mice. CBG can also affect positively the reactions in the brain, therefore can decrease anxiety and muscle tension.

CBG’s potential and medical benefits

CBG is not as much of a known substance, although lab-testing and research is being done on considering a possible high, very positive benefits for a human-kind today and in the future. This might be of a matter that we won’t imagine our lives without it soon, and I mean very soon: 

The human body’s built-in endocannabinoid system (ECS) works to keep the body in its balanced state. While there are specific details about how cannabinoids work, in general the endocannabinoid system performs different functions specific to each area of the body. The ECS is largely comprised of endocannabinoids, receptors, and enzymes that are believed to help regulate a variety of functions in humans including sleep, mood, memory, appetite, reproduction, and pain sensation. For example, at an injury site, the ECS can help regulate immune cells to limit inflammation. This means, that it serves a vital purpose for our health and well-being because it regulates key aspects of our biology.

Researches have been done

There are done some specific researches, and results for medicinal use are very promising:

Endocannabinoid receptors are prevalent in eye structures, and interestingly, CBG is thought to be particularly effective in treating glaucoma because it reduces intraocular pressure. It is a powerful vasodilator and has neuroprotective effects to boot.

In a recent 2015 study, CBG was shown to protect neurons in mice with Huntington’s disease, which is characterized by nerve cell degeneration in the brain.

CBG is showing great promise as a cancer fighter. Specifically, CBG was shown to block receptors that cause cancer cell growth. In one such study, it was shown to inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells in mice, thereby slowing colon cancer growth.

European research shows evidence that CBG is an effective antibacterial agent, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) microbial strains resistant to several classes of drugs. Since the 1950s, topical formulations of cannabis have been effective in skin infections, but researchers at the time were unaware of the plant’s chemical composition.

In a very recent 2017 study, researchers showed that a form of CBG was a very effective appetite stimulant in rats. This may lead to a novel non-psychotropic therapeutic option for cachexia, the muscle wasting and severe weight loss seen in late stage cancer and other diseases.

In a study that looked at the effects of five different cannabinoids on bladder contractions, CBG tested best at inhibiting muscle contractions, so it may be a future tool in preventing bladder dysfunction disorders.

Scientists are excited, so should we!  These initial CBG results are a path for the bright future. Scientists are promoting further research with CBG alone or in combination with other cannabinoids and use it in therapies for the treatment of multiple maladies. Because it is non-psychotropic, CBG has a promising wide range of potential applications not only for the problems mentioned above, but also as an analgesic, therapy for psoriasis, and effective antidepressant.

https://biomedicanna.com/product/cbg-paste/
If You have any question, contact us!