CBD drops
  • January 26, 2021
  • Health
  • by Kotryna
  • 358
  • 0

While in various parts of the world, there are still concerns whether or not we should legalize recreational cannabis, people been long using hemp to heal multiple pains and improve their life quality. However, we could probably count the years or decades back when hemp began living its actual glory days. Technological development helped scientists awaken public confidence in hemp, and now it is used in almost all sectors. Still, the most advanced here is the field of medicine and health. Medical scientists have long been using cannabis to treat various diseases, and quite recently, they reached an exciting achievement.

Many current illnesses ranging from flu to infections gets treated by prescribing antibiotics to the patients. Sadly, some bacteria have become drug-resistant throughout the years, forcing doctors to look for new ways to treat them. Here CBD steps in. 

One of the most recent research done by the University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience and global leaders in pharmaceutical research Botanix Pharmaceuticals Limited has proven successful as CBD killed some dangerous bacteria. Both of the parties state that their collaboration allowed for the quicker research process, ensuring approval and use of the drug to treat patients as soon as possible. 

CBD, which is the main component of cannabis, surely killed bacteria that cause gonorrhoea, meningitis, and legionnaires. Specialists team mimicked a two-week patient treatment in laboratory models to see how bacteria mutated to resist CBD. Yet, findings revealed bacteria were less likely to do so.

Mentioned research paints a positive future for many patients and their relatives. Besides stopping bacterial growth, CBD can kill them, meaning that a new age for treatments has already begun and is nowhere near stopping anytime soon. We are proud of what already has been done and are impatiently waiting for more exciting achievements involving hemp and CBD.

Based on the information provided by the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Australia. 

Add Comment

If You have any question, contact us!
0